Posts in Review
Tammi Campbell at Arsenal Contemporary NY

Whitehot Magazine, by Johnathan Goodman

Mar, 2019

Tammi Campbell lives and works in Saskatoon  Canada, Her show at Arsenal Contemporary NY on the Lower East Side borrowed from major modernists and contemporary artists--Joseph Albers and Frank Stella among them--and then adds quite literally a contemporary cover, in the form of seemingly real package materials--bubble wrap, masking tape, etc.

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Chère

Canadian Art

Jan 9, 2019

The suggestively placed knobs and shiny surfaces of feminist artist Nicola L’s functional sculptures tempt the viewer to stroke, poke, pull and touch. A commode, coffee table, bookshelf and two “sofas” playing dress-up as furniture invite sublimation and use while mocking the impulse to realize an absurd desire.

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Beg, Borrow, Steal : With Several Exhibitions Involving Appropriation, New York Has a Second ‘Pictures ‘ Moment

ArtNews, by Alex Greenberger

Aug 21, 2017

Hannah Perry’s densely layered photo-based works at Arsenal Contemporary also addressed this never-ending stream of images. Pictures of eyes, palm trees, and hands, all sourced from the Web, are superimposed on each other in these silkscreened pieces, along with text that hints at violence, both emotional and physical. “Get out of my life,” reads one.

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Critics’ Pick

ArtForum, by Blair Cannon

Jul, 2017

This exhibition views the human body through its dehumanization. The show’s title alone, “Sticky Fingers,” evokes all manner of flesh, tainted and tantalizing. Caroline Mesquita’s carnival of sheet-metal monsters, displayed here as sculptures, also surrounds the artist in her video The Ballad, 2017, where they engage in standoffs and sexual acts.

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Hannah Perry : Viruses Worth Spreading

ArtReview, by Jeppe Ugelvig

May, 2017

During the performance at her new solo show, British artist Hannah Perry is seen sitting on the floor, hunched over her laptop and typing while smoking a cigarette. In the dark room around her, a group of performers bounce off contorted white blobs in plastic and foam scattered on the ground, momentarily enacting postures of affect such as longing, despair, anger and desire.

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