Posts tagged Artist Presentation
Kapwani Kiwanga

Born in 1978 in Hamilton (Ontario, Canada)
Lives and works in Paris (France)

Kiwanga's artistic practice is imbued with her background in anthropology and comparative religion. Respecting a rigorous method, the artist makes her works a continuation of her research, exploring relations of power through the symbolism of certain objects or materials. Through her installations, the artist recreates the dynamics of oppression and control present in our society and invites the visitor to experiment with them in an active way, in order to reveal them and question them. Kapwani Kiwanga is the recipient of the 2018 Sobey Art Award.

The work pink-blue represents the realization of the many researches made by the artist on the so-called scientifically proven effects of architecture and colors on human behavior. By inviting the visitor to experience an environment reminiscent of the long corridors of the hospital and prison spheres, Kiwanga questions the advantages but also the limits of the social use of colors. The pink colour, for example, would have the ability to reduce aggression and prevent conflict. As for the blue light, it would prevent certain dangerous behaviors

Arsenal Contemporary is proud to present an artwork from the Giverny Capital Art Collection. The presentation of this work was made possible thanks to the Giverny Capital Foundation for Contemporary Art

Kapwani Kiwanga, pink-blue, 2017, Baker-Miller pink paint, white fluorescent lights, blue fluorescent lights, Variable dimensions. Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Anselm Kiefer

Born in 1945 in Donaueschingen (Germany)
Lives and works in Croissy-Beaubourg (France)

Anselm Kiefer’s practice examines the past and its post-war situation, addressing taboos and conflicts of history such as the Nazie domination or the Cold War politics. A law student, he shifted to fine arts and studies at the Staatliche Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf with the conceptual artist Joseph Beuys. Beuys influences Kiefer’s practice with an interest toward cultural myths, metaphors and personal symbolic vocabulary. Anselm Kiefer represents Germany at the Venice Biennale in 1980 and has had multiple solo exhibitions, among others at the Museum of Modern Art (New York) and at the Guggenheim (New York). 

Der Brennende Dornbusch refers to the Bible in which Moses, while in the desert, witnesses the first of many miracles. A monumental four-panel composition, the piece oscillates between painting and sculpture, and explores themes related to good and evil, rebirth and death. An accumulation of materials such as found chairs, branches, lead and thick paint inhabits the arid landscape evoking the exemplary story of salvation in the desolate history of mankind.

Anselm Kiefer, Der Brennende Dornbusch, 2007, Mixed media on board, lead and glass, 130 5/8" x 302 ½" (332 x 768 cm). Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Anish Kapoor
anish-kapoor.jpg

Born in 1954 in Mumbai (India)
Lives and works in London (United Kingdom)

Anish Kapoor is one of the most influential sculptors of his generation. The plastician artist is known for his massive public art projects and for the particular emphasis he places on materials. Referring back to western and oriental cultures, Kapoor’s artworks stand out due to their minimalist treatment, their curved shapes and their monochromatic colour schemes. His recent works explore reflective surfaces and their inherent power to distort space and to induce a contemplative state in the viewer.

That is exactly the effect produced by Mirror. The viewer is engaged in the work through the reflection of his own body and the distortion of the environment around it. Mirror works to unfold deep metaphysical polarities such as being and non-being, the tangible and the intangible. Referring to the elementary components of being and of nature through its basic form, the sphere impresses with its sheer size and the unique spatial experience it provides.

Anish Kapoor, Mirror, 2015, Stainless steel, 63" x 63" x 7 1/8" (160 x 160 x 18 cm). In the foreground: John De Andrea, Cierra, 2003, Polyvinyl, oil, natural hair, 31 1/8" x 51 1/8" x 17 3/4" (79 x 130 x 45 cm). Photo credit: Richard-Max Tremblay

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Tracey Emin
tracey-emin.jpg

Born in 1963 in Croydon (United Kingdom)
Lives and works in London (United Kingdom)

Tracey Emin received a Master of Fine Arts from the Royal College of Art, and was awarded an honorary degree from the institution in 2007. Emin’s practice bears testament to her involvement with the Young British Artists group, known for its experimental approach to materials. Emin’s work is inherently autobiographical and provocative in its subject matter; the artist notably presented her own bed as an installation piece at the Tate Gallery in 1999. Everyone I Have Ever Slept With (1995) and My Bed (1998) have marked the history of art for their overt engagement with feminist discourse.  Her body of work holds a secure place in the collections of several prestigious institutions, which include the Museum of Modern Art (New York, United States) and the The Tate Modern (London, United Kingdom) amongst others.

The painted work This is life without you - You made me Feel like This is part of a recent series pursuing the Edvard Munch and Egon Schiele’s figurative and expressive tradition. Emin explores the intrinsic suffering of human experience, from the fraught territory of sexual relationships to the physical trauma of abortion and the recent passing of her mother. In a free and asserted gesture, the artist expresses her emotional turmoil by a tension between the honesty of confession and the use of a stylized aesthetic. The application of a reddish chromatic palette heightens the physicality of the female body and makes an allusion to desire, birth and death.

From the 1990s onward, neon lights become a distinctive element of Emin’s multimedia practice. The British artist considers neon to be a powerful tool to arouse viewers’ emotions. The industrial material allows her to generate highly personal content that places her most intimate desires and thoughts on display. In a stylistic rendering faithful to her first neon artworks, You Made Me Feel Like This expresses in Emin’s own calligraphy a short and revealing sentence that acts on a conceptual level as a missive. The artist’s neon sentences are poignant, yet manifest a certain ambiguity. Born out of her personal experiences, Emin’s vague messages imitate the universal character of exchanges between lovers.

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Tracey Emin, This is life without you - You made me Feel like This, 2018, Acrylic on canvas, 59 3/4" x 72" (151,8 x 182,9 cm). Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

 

Tracey Emin, You Made Me Feel Like This, 2018, Ed. 1/3, Neon (magenta and light red), 28 1/8" x 65 5/8" (71,4 x 166,7 cm). Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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John De Andrea

Born in 1941 in Denver (Colorado, United States)
Lives and works in Denver (Colorado, United States)

John de Andrea is known for his hyperrealistic human sculptures. By working with living models, de Andrea manufactures replicas of human bodies in true-to-life postures that capture the uniqueness of each of his subjects. While abstraction dominated American art during the 1970s, de Andrea’s realistic sculptures allowed him to be one of the first American artists to be exhibited at the prestigious Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris.

Cierra offers an utterly illusionistic rendering, characteristic of John de Andrea’s practice. With the addition of natural hair, the figure engages the viewer in an individual and intimate experience. The effect brought on by this immobile human presence is what draws the viewer in, calling on us to reflect on our own body’s relationship to the work. De Andrea focuses specifically on anatomical details, thus causing an unsettling blurring of the line between reality and fiction.

John De Andrea, Cierra, 2003, Polyvinyl, oil, natural hair, 31 1/8" x 51 1/8" x 17 3/4" (79 x 130 x 45 cm). In the background: Anish Kapoor, Mirror, 2015, Stainless steel, 63" x 63" x 7 1/8" (160 x 160 x 18 cm). Photo credit: Richard-Max Tremblay

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Cynthia Daignault

Born in 1978 in Baltimore (Maryland, United States)
Lives and works in Brooklyn (New York, United States)

Cynthia Daignault obtained a bachelor of arts at Stanford University and was under the mentoring of artists such as Kara Walker. Her work was shown in the United States at the Night Gallery in Los Angeles, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and, internationally, at the Sunday Painter gallery in London. Daignault is also a writer and founded the A-Z publications. 

Daignault is known for deconstructing the canvas into multiple pieces that are then reunited, a practice that she compares to the narrative arts, like film or short stories because of their length. The format of her paintings is reminiscent of installation and immersive art. What Happened is a series of a hundred oil paintings that track the last hundred years of American culture, from the Vietnam war to Kim Kardashian, all rendered in Daignault’s painterly reverence: in black and white.

11/9/2016 (The Washington Post) is a pictorial representation of the front page of the newspaper from November 9th, 2016, the day Donald Trump won the American presidential elections. The artist chose to reproduce on canvas, in a voluntarily loose style with imprecise outlines and part of the text made unreadable, a slightly reframed photograph of the 75th president of the United States and his vice-president Mike Pence. This way, the artist captures a key historical moment, elevated along with other important dates to the status of major temporal markers, witnesses to positive or negative period change —depending on one’s worldview.

Cynthia Daignault, What Happened, 2018, Oil on linen, Variable dimensions

 

Cynthia Daignault, 11/9/2016 (The Washington Post), 2017, Oil on linen, 11" x 12" (27,9 x 30,5 cm)

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Sascha Braunig

Born in 1983 in Qualicum Beach (British Columbia, Canada)
Lives and works in Portland (Oregon, United States)

Sascha Braunig holds a bachelor in Painting and Photography from the Cooper Union (New York) and a Master in Fine Arts from Yale University (Connecticut). Her work has been presented in solo shows in many renowned institutions such as MoMA PS1 (New York), the Foxy Production (New York), the Kunstall Stavanger (Stavanger) and the Rodolphe Janssen Gallery (Brussels). Her work is also part of many public and private collections.

Driven by a neo-surrealist style, Sascha Braunig’s production flirts between abstraction and realism. Oscillating between a photorealistic rendering of material and light, her compositions open on abstraction by the arbitrary representation of the humanoid form. The Crease represents a twisted female body without features, a central figure in Braunig’s representations, that traduces multiple contemporary troubles - whether they are associated with the objectification of the woman’s body, from which the artist claims to be inspired, or by the detachment of the body and the flesh from the digital self.

Sascha Braunig, The Crease, 2018, Oil on linen over panel, 55" × 34 1/8" × 2 1/8" (139,7 x 86,4 x 5,1 cm). Photo credit: David Wong

 

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Sayre Gomez

Born in 1982 in Chicago (Illinois, United States)
Lives and works in Los Angeles (United States)

Sayre Gomez holds a Bachelor of Visual Arts from the Art Institute of Chicago (2005) and a Master of Art from the California Institute of the Arts (2008). His recent solo exhibitions were held in locations such as the François Ghebaly Gallery of Los Angeles and the Rodolphe Janssen Gallery in Brussels. He recently exhibited in group shows at the Yuz Museum in Shanghai and at the Shane Campbell Gallery in Chicago. Some of his artworks are part of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s collection and of the Rubell family’s private collection.

Paintings, sculptures, installations and artists' books, among others, make up the work of Sayre Gomez. His conceptual work is characterized by a formalism inspired by typography and graphic design. In Gomez’s work, particular attention is often paid to storefronts, traces of the passing of time, and details of degradation and obsolescence. This is the case of Hop Louie Doors, a tribute to Hop Louie, the first Chinese restaurant of Los Angeles, opened in 1941. A true icon of L.A.’s Chinatown, the restaurant closed its doors in 2017, after more than 75 years of activity.

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Sayre Gomez, Hop Louie Doors, 2018, Acrylic on canvas, 84" x 120" (213,36 x 304,8 cm). Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Pierre Dorion

Photo credit: @Evergon. Courtesy of the artist

Born in 1959 in Ottawa (Ontario, Canada)
Lives and works in Montreal (Quebec, Canada)

Principally narrative, Dorion’s paintings gravitate towards the questions raised by the impact of mechanical imaging on the pictorial practice. He has exhibited at the Beijing International Art Biennale, at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, at Galerie de l’UQÀM and at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal. His solo exhibitions include Close to the Edge presented at Diaz Contemporary in Toronto and at Galerie René Blouin in Montreal. 

Pierre Dorion’s paintings draw from snapshots with which he documents situations encountered during his wanderings, mainly in the city. His curious compositions alternate ceaselessly between abstraction and figuration. For this in situ triptych, Dorion photographed the space of the de Gaspé building that he would later occupy during his exhibition with Occurrence gallery. As the journalist Éric Clément points out, the large windows provide a panorama of the east of the city, and the colors of a setting sun give, on half of the painting, variations of purple, from mild to dark tones.

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Pierre Dorion, Vitrines (5445 de Gaspé), 2017, Oil on linen canvas, 72" x 170 1/4" (182,88 x 432,44 cm). Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

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Genesis Belanger
Photo credit: @stevebenisty. Courtesy of the artist

Photo credit: @stevebenisty. Courtesy of the artist

Born in 1978 in the United States 
Lives and works in Brooklyn (New York, United States)

Genesis Belanger received a master’s degree in visual arts in Combined Media from the Hunter College (New York) and has exhibited her work across the United States in spaces such as The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum (Connecticut). Her work has appeared in several publications as the New York Times, The New Yorker and Artforum. The American artist worked in the advertising and fashion industries before focusing on her sculptural practice, a background that largely influences her critical and aesthetic interests. Belanger’s practice looks into the capacity advertising has to manipulate consumers’ desires, solely by means of creating an aesthetic appeal.

Daily Adoration presents a vanity where symbols related to contemporary alienation mingle with consumer goods from the world of cosmetics. While at first glance her objects seduce by their polished form, they transform under a watchful eye, revealing their surreal character. Created from clay, a medium associated with the hand-made, her work questions the hierarchy separating the object of art from the craft object. The work was presented in a joint exhibition alongside Emily Mae Smith where Medusa Moderne extended the feminist critical thinking of Belanger's installation.

Genesis Belanger, Daily Adoration, 2018, Stoneware, porcelain, plywood, fabric, 46 3/8" x 63" x 28" (118 x 160 x 71,1 cm). Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Douglas Coupland

Douglas Coupland
April 2019
Vancouver, Canada
Photo Credit: Ken Mayer Studio
@Douglas Coupland/CMYK
Contact: coupland.com

Born in 1961 in Baden Söllingen (Rheinmünster, Germany)
Lives and works in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada)

Douglas Coupland’s creative achievements reach beyond the visual arts scene. A prolific writer, Coupland publishes thirteen novels during his career and is also the author of several nonfiction works, journalistic pieces, and screenplays. His artistic practice reflects a profound interest in technology and its visual iterations, and incorporates pop art influences through a distinctly graphic style. Coupland pursues his studies at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver and at the Hokkaido College of Art and Design in Japan. Recently, his work has been the subject of two major retrospectives at the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (Toronto) and at the Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art (Rotterdam). 

The rows of identical Lego® block houses hark back to Coupland’s youth in the 1970s and to the one lego kit he had as a child: model no. 345, which is then sold under the name “Modern House”. Meticulously aligned, the 100 plastic miniatures present the suburban expanse of cities in the post-war era through a dystopian lens. Coupland’s work sheds light on both the physical uniformity of North American neighborhoods and the cultural homogeneity of its society. 345 Modern Houses also bears testament to the artist’s personal and ongoing investment in the collection of everyday objects.

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Douglas Coupland, 345 Modern Houses, 2014, Lego, resin, 4" x 120" x 90" (10,16 x 304,8 x 228,6 cm). Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

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Dorian FitzGerald

Born in 1975 in Toronto (Ontario, Canada)
Lives and works in Toronto (Ontario, Canada)

The visual practice of American artist Dorian Fitzgerald revisits the pictorial technique with charged compositions that capture the eye. The artist borrows a pre-existing imagery that he transposes in a digital version in order to trace his model on canvas. He then delineates each of the tints by caulking to fill them with solid-color surfaces of acrylic, thus creating a hypnotic effect defined in fractal zones. His works have appeared in several major institutions including the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and the Galerie de l’UQÀM.

Hacker-Pschorr Beerhall, Oktoberfest, Munich is the work on the largest scale ever produced by the artist: it took him three years to complete it. The artwork represents a fictional scene from the traditional German Oktoberfest festival celebrating Bavarian culture. The artist, who sees himself as a contemporary court painter, translates in this work his socio-political interests with the lush aspect of its visual effects and its equally opulent representations. Thanks to a symmetrical and charged composition, Fitzgerald documents the excess of consumption typical of the contemporary era.

Artwork exhibited with kind permission of the artist and Clint Roenisch Gallery

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Dorian FitzGerald, Hacker-Pschorr Beerhall, Oktoberfest, Munich, 2005, Acrylique et calfeutrage sur toile, 216" x 144" (548,64 x 365,76 cm). Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

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Graham Caldwell
Photo fournie par l'artiste

Photo fournie par l'artiste

Born in 1973 in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania, United States)
Lives and works in Brooklyn (New York, United States)

Predominantly composed of glass and mirrors, Graham Caldwell’s works take shape in various manifestations but always call upon viewers to reconsider their perception of reality. Caldwell has exhibited his work in solo shows at the Martos Gallery in New York as well as at G Fine Art in Washington, DC. 

Caldwell’s sculpture entitled Compound Eye evokes the disturbing feeling of being watched. The mirror’s fixed gazes observe overlapping spaces, not unlike the security cameras that surveil empty streets and deserted passageways. This cluster of eyes composed of countless mirrors watches us while simultaneously distorting the image of passersby, effectively constructing a new visual logic. 


Graham Caldwell, Compound Eye, 2008, Mirrors and steel, 92" x 98" x 50" (234 x 248 x 127 cm). Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Bharti Kher

Born in 1969 in London (United Kingdom)
Lives and works in New Delhi (India)

Bharti Kher holds a Bachelor of Arts in painting from the Newcastle Polytechnic. After her studies, Kher, following a political vision that colors her work by the means of artistic references to the postcolonial condition, emigrated from her native United Kingdom to establish herself in Delhi. As part of her practice, she works media such as sculpture, painting, installation, and ready-made. She is a recipient of the ARKEN Art Prize (2010) and is a Chevalier of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres of France (2015). 

Bharti Kher’s practice explores the non-physical by the means of the material world to address, among other things, cultural identity, hybridity, and the spectrum of the female body. She uses the bindi, symbol at the intersection of Hindu spirituality and female gender affirmation, by multiplying it on the pictorial surface. This technique transmits both the loss of meaning caused by cultural appropriation in tandem with mass production, and the handmade and sacred gesture that is repetition. With her abstract compositions, Kher rethinks tradition in a contemporary situation.

Bharti Kher, Algorithm for a goodheadfuck, 2018, Bindis on painted board, frame, 58" x 2 3/4" (147,32 x 6,99 cm). Photo credit: Isabelle Fexa

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Alonsa Guevara
Photo credit: James Razko

Photo credit: James Razko

Born in 1986 in Rancagua (Chile)
Lives and works in Brooklyn (New York, United States)

Chilean artist Alonsa Guevara holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile (Santiago) and a Master of Fine Arts from the New York Academy of Art (New York), where she is selected to pursue a fellowship during the year 2014-2015. While attending university, she also receives a grant from the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation (2013). Her work is mentioned in several publications, such as Forbes and VICE, and is part of many private collections, including that of the New York Academy of Art and of The Seavest Collection. 

Working primarily with painting and sculpture, Guevara explores the possibilities of the imaginary through the themes of desire and fertility. Herencia is part of a series of naturalistic works depicting naked bodies surrounded by fruits. The symbolism associated with fruits and flowers is recurrent in Guevara's compositions and testifies to the intimate relationship between nature and the body, especially feminine. The artist considers these canvases as ceremonies where this fundamental relationship to which all relate is put forward, among others by means of an aerial point of view, which allows the observer to feel incorporated into the work and to become actively involved in the spirituality that emerges from it.

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Alonsa Guevara, Herencia, 2018, Oil on canvas, 48" x 48" (121,92 x 121,92 cm). Photo credit: Isabelle Fexa

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Faig Ahmed

Born in 1982 in Sumqayit (Azerbaijan)
Lives and works in Baku (Azerbaijan)

In his conceptual work, Faig Ahmed uses traditional decorative crafts and the visual language of carpets to create impressive contemporary sculptures. He represented his country during the Venice Biennale in 2007, and has more recently been exhibited at the Sapar Contemporary (New York) and at the VOLTA Basel’s art fair by Montoro12 Contemporary (Switzerland).

The flowing carpet Gautama comes from a project named Liquid Series, where the artist suggests numerical manipulations without actually making the carpets digitally. The effect of distortion and the digital glitch allusions, all hand-woven, break the conventions associated with craft and offer a new way to perceive these cultural icons. The artist cleverly makes the traditional and the contemporary collide, saying that he is interested in the past because it is the most stable conception of our lives. 

Faig Ahmed, Gautama, 2017, Handmade wool carpet, 112" x 149" (284 x 378 cm). Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Nicolas Baier

Born in 1967 in Montreal (Quebec, Canada)
Lives and works in Montreal (Quebec, Canada)

Often described as a collagiste, Nicolas Baier uses digital imaging technologies to compose photographic images inspired by the places where he lives and the places he passes through during his life. His works can be found in public and private collections worldwide, including those of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the National Gallery of Canada, and the Harvard Business School’s Schwartz Collection.

Eternity is a sculpture with a commanding presence. Composed of many seamlessly stacked strata, the exterior of this undulating curtain with a mirror finish excludes all technique traces. This mirrored wall hides a message; the word Eternity written in classic cursives. However, since the piece cannot be seen from above, knowledge or even recognition of eternity is adamantly denied. Thus, Baier aims to give form to the boundless mystery of the world, and to the vanity of mankind’s desire to grasp the future.

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Nicolas Baier, Eternity, 2014, Stainless steel, 118" x 300" x 102" (300 x 760 x 260 cm). Photo credit: David Wong

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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