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Kapwani Kiwanga

Born in 1978 in Hamilton (Ontario, Canada)
Lives and works in Paris (France)

Kiwanga's artistic practice is imbued with her background in anthropology and comparative religion. Respecting a rigorous method, the artist makes her works a continuation of her research, exploring relations of power through the symbolism of certain objects or materials. Through her installations, the artist recreates the dynamics of oppression and control present in our society and invites the visitor to experiment with them in an active way, in order to reveal them and question them. Kapwani Kiwanga is the recipient of the 2018 Sobey Art Award.

The work pink-blue represents the realization of the many researches made by the artist on the so-called scientifically proven effects of architecture and colors on human behavior. By inviting the visitor to experience an environment reminiscent of the long corridors of the hospital and prison spheres, Kiwanga questions the advantages but also the limits of the social use of colors. The pink colour, for example, would have the ability to reduce aggression and prevent conflict. As for the blue light, it would prevent certain dangerous behaviors

Arsenal Contemporary is proud to present an artwork from the Giverny Capital Art Collection. The presentation of this work was made possible thanks to the Giverny Capital Foundation for Contemporary Art

Kapwani Kiwanga, pink-blue, 2017, Baker-Miller pink paint, white fluorescent lights, blue fluorescent lights, Variable dimensions. Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Anselm Kiefer

Born in 1945 in Donaueschingen (Germany)
Lives and works in Croissy-Beaubourg (France)

Anselm Kiefer’s practice examines the past and its post-war situation, addressing taboos and conflicts of history such as the Nazie domination or the Cold War politics. A law student, he shifted to fine arts and studies at the Staatliche Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf with the conceptual artist Joseph Beuys. Beuys influences Kiefer’s practice with an interest toward cultural myths, metaphors and personal symbolic vocabulary. Anselm Kiefer represents Germany at the Venice Biennale in 1980 and has had multiple solo exhibitions, among others at the Museum of Modern Art (New York) and at the Guggenheim (New York). 

Der Brennende Dornbusch refers to the Bible in which Moses, while in the desert, witnesses the first of many miracles. A monumental four-panel composition, the piece oscillates between painting and sculpture, and explores themes related to good and evil, rebirth and death. An accumulation of materials such as found chairs, branches, lead and thick paint inhabits the arid landscape evoking the exemplary story of salvation in the desolate history of mankind.

Anselm Kiefer, Der Brennende Dornbusch, 2007, Mixed media on board, lead and glass, 130 5/8" x 302 ½" (332 x 768 cm). Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Anish Kapoor
anish-kapoor.jpg

Born in 1954 in Mumbai (India)
Lives and works in London (United Kingdom)

Anish Kapoor is one of the most influential sculptors of his generation. The plastician artist is known for his massive public art projects and for the particular emphasis he places on materials. Referring back to western and oriental cultures, Kapoor’s artworks stand out due to their minimalist treatment, their curved shapes and their monochromatic colour schemes. His recent works explore reflective surfaces and their inherent power to distort space and to induce a contemplative state in the viewer.

That is exactly the effect produced by Mirror. The viewer is engaged in the work through the reflection of his own body and the distortion of the environment around it. Mirror works to unfold deep metaphysical polarities such as being and non-being, the tangible and the intangible. Referring to the elementary components of being and of nature through its basic form, the sphere impresses with its sheer size and the unique spatial experience it provides.

Anish Kapoor, Mirror, 2015, Stainless steel, 63" x 63" x 7 1/8" (160 x 160 x 18 cm). In the foreground: John De Andrea, Cierra, 2003, Polyvinyl, oil, natural hair, 31 1/8" x 51 1/8" x 17 3/4" (79 x 130 x 45 cm). Photo credit: Richard-Max Tremblay

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Bharti Kher

Born in 1969 in London (United Kingdom)
Lives and works in New Delhi (India)

Bharti Kher holds a Bachelor of Arts in painting from the Newcastle Polytechnic. After her studies, Kher, following a political vision that colors her work by the means of artistic references to the postcolonial condition, emigrated from her native United Kingdom to establish herself in Delhi. As part of her practice, she works media such as sculpture, painting, installation, and ready-made. She is a recipient of the ARKEN Art Prize (2010) and is a Chevalier of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres of France (2015). 

Bharti Kher’s practice explores the non-physical by the means of the material world to address, among other things, cultural identity, hybridity, and the spectrum of the female body. She uses the bindi, symbol at the intersection of Hindu spirituality and female gender affirmation, by multiplying it on the pictorial surface. This technique transmits both the loss of meaning caused by cultural appropriation in tandem with mass production, and the handmade and sacred gesture that is repetition. With her abstract compositions, Kher rethinks tradition in a contemporary situation.

Bharti Kher, Algorithm for a goodheadfuck, 2018, Bindis on painted board, frame, 58" x 2 3/4" (147,32 x 6,99 cm). Photo credit: Isabelle Fexa

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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