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John De Andrea

Born in 1941 in Denver (Colorado, United States)
Lives and works in Denver (Colorado, United States)

John de Andrea is known for his hyperrealistic human sculptures. By working with living models, de Andrea manufactures replicas of human bodies in true-to-life postures that capture the uniqueness of each of his subjects. While abstraction dominated American art during the 1970s, de Andrea’s realistic sculptures allowed him to be one of the first American artists to be exhibited at the prestigious Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris.

Cierra offers an utterly illusionistic rendering, characteristic of John de Andrea’s practice. With the addition of natural hair, the figure engages the viewer in an individual and intimate experience. The effect brought on by this immobile human presence is what draws the viewer in, calling on us to reflect on our own body’s relationship to the work. De Andrea focuses specifically on anatomical details, thus causing an unsettling blurring of the line between reality and fiction.

John De Andrea, Cierra, 2003, Polyvinyl, oil, natural hair, 31 1/8" x 51 1/8" x 17 3/4" (79 x 130 x 45 cm). In the background: Anish Kapoor, Mirror, 2015, Stainless steel, 63" x 63" x 7 1/8" (160 x 160 x 18 cm). Photo credit: Richard-Max Tremblay

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Cynthia Daignault

Born in 1978 in Baltimore (Maryland, United States)
Lives and works in Brooklyn (New York, United States)

Cynthia Daignault obtained a bachelor of arts at Stanford University and was under the mentoring of artists such as Kara Walker. Her work was shown in the United States at the Night Gallery in Los Angeles, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and, internationally, at the Sunday Painter gallery in London. Daignault is also a writer and founded the A-Z publications. 

Daignault is known for deconstructing the canvas into multiple pieces that are then reunited, a practice that she compares to the narrative arts, like film or short stories because of their length. The format of her paintings is reminiscent of installation and immersive art. What Happened is a series of a hundred oil paintings that track the last hundred years of American culture, from the Vietnam war to Kim Kardashian, all rendered in Daignault’s painterly reverence: in black and white.

11/9/2016 (The Washington Post) is a pictorial representation of the front page of the newspaper from November 9th, 2016, the day Donald Trump won the American presidential elections. The artist chose to reproduce on canvas, in a voluntarily loose style with imprecise outlines and part of the text made unreadable, a slightly reframed photograph of the 75th president of the United States and his vice-president Mike Pence. This way, the artist captures a key historical moment, elevated along with other important dates to the status of major temporal markers, witnesses to positive or negative period change —depending on one’s worldview.

Cynthia Daignault, What Happened, 2018, Oil on linen, Variable dimensions

 

Cynthia Daignault, 11/9/2016 (The Washington Post), 2017, Oil on linen, 11" x 12" (27,9 x 30,5 cm)

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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Pierre Dorion

Photo credit: @Evergon. Courtesy of the artist

Born in 1959 in Ottawa (Ontario, Canada)
Lives and works in Montreal (Quebec, Canada)

Principally narrative, Dorion’s paintings gravitate towards the questions raised by the impact of mechanical imaging on the pictorial practice. He has exhibited at the Beijing International Art Biennale, at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, at Galerie de l’UQÀM and at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal. His solo exhibitions include Close to the Edge presented at Diaz Contemporary in Toronto and at Galerie René Blouin in Montreal. 

Pierre Dorion’s paintings draw from snapshots with which he documents situations encountered during his wanderings, mainly in the city. His curious compositions alternate ceaselessly between abstraction and figuration. For this in situ triptych, Dorion photographed the space of the de Gaspé building that he would later occupy during his exhibition with Occurrence gallery. As the journalist Éric Clément points out, the large windows provide a panorama of the east of the city, and the colors of a setting sun give, on half of the painting, variations of purple, from mild to dark tones.

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Pierre Dorion, Vitrines (5445 de Gaspé), 2017, Oil on linen canvas, 72" x 170 1/4" (182,88 x 432,44 cm). Photo credit: Romain Guilbault

Other exhibitions of the artist at Arsenal Contemporary Art

 

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